Welcome to the first-ever Classic FM TV Top 20 with S Magazine in the Sunday Express. You voted in your thousands and now we can reveal your favourite 20 TV themes. Explore the chart below - and make sure you listen to Classic FM from 9am on the 15–19th February, when John Suchet will play pieces from the the top 20 every day in his show.

  • From 2010 to 2015, the multi-award-winning period drama Downton Abbey dominated our television screens, captivating viewers all around the world. Created by Julian Fellowes, Downton brought the lives and times of the aristocratic Crawley family - and their servants - into our living rooms. Composer John Lunn's music eschewed post-Edwardian period pastiche for an urgent, pulsing minimalist approach. It's a haunting theme that evokes the turning of years, and the uncertainty and undercurrents of tragedy that touched everyone's lives during a period of transition, from the sinking of the Titanic in 1912, through the First World War, and into the turbulent 1920s. Listen and find out more

  • First screened in 2001, Band of Brothers was a superior HBO TV mini-series, produced by Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks. The story followed a group of young World War II paratroopers from training, through the Battle of the Bulge, to their capture of Hitler's Eagle's Nest. Scoring ten hours of music was a mammoth task for Michael Kamen, best known for Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves. The substantial budget allowed him to bring together the London Metropolitan Orchestra and a full choir to give weight and pathos to his epic, elegiac soundtrack. Kamen died two years later, aged just 55. Listen and find out more

  • The British public's thirst for classy crime drama was well and truly satiated by John Thaw's brilliant portrayal of the world-weary, classical music-loving detective, who entered our lives between 1987 and 2000. The atmospheric theme tune was composed by Barrington Pheloung, who employed a Morse code motif for the letters that spell the name M.O.R.S.E. In occasional episodes, Pheloung's music would even reveal the name of the killer in Morse code, or sometimes the name of another character (as a red herring). The series also contained plenty of Morse's beloved opera and other classical favourites, and spawned several best-selling albums. Listen and find out more

  • Khachaturian's score for the ballet Spartacus was a massive hit in Soviet Russia, winning the coveted Lenin Prize in 1954. By far the ballet's most captivating moment comes in Act II when Spartacus manages to free his enslaved wife Phrygia and the lovers celebrate. The music's passionate, yearning waves of joy and ecstatic climax found their visual counterpart when put to use over the opening credits of the 1970s drama, The Onedin Line. Set in Liverpool in the latter half of the 19th century, it dealt with the rise of a shipping family, and starred the magnificently sideburned Peter Gilmore. Listen and find out more

  • There was nothing more elegant or intelligent on television in 1981 than John Mortimer's adaptation of Evelyn Waugh's 1945 novel. The series, which was listed as one of TIME magazine's 100 Best TV Shows of All-Time, starred Jeremy Irons as army captain Charles Ryder returning to station his regiment in a stately home which triggers many memories for him of the family who lived there. Geoffrey Burgon's Bafta-nominated score is at once expansive, regal and melancholic, with wistful oboe and trumpet, matched with horns that conjure up the pomp of Brideshead and the demise of Lord Marchmain and his family. Listen and find out more

  • Denis King was a member with his two brothers of one of the most successful British pop groups of the 1950s and 1960s, aptly named The King Brothers. When they split in 1970, Denis went on to study orchestration at the Guildhall School of Music and shortly afterwards got his big break in television, writing the theme 'Galloping Home' for Black Beauty, which won him an Ivor Novello Award. The popular series ran between 1972 and 1974 and the rollicking, music with its pounding timpani and Swingle-esque vocals, provided the unforgettable soundtrack to teatime for a generation of school children. Listen and find out more

  • on Grainer was one of the busiest men in television in the 1960s, composing for dozens of shows including the award-winning Maigret. In 1963 he created the eerie, other-wordly and ground-breaking electronic theme for Doctor Who. Over time, like so many prolific composers before him, Grainer was saddened that he was mainly associated with just the one theme. With Dr Who's revival in 2005, Murray Gold provided a new arrangement that featured samples from the original with new elements added. Other arrangements of the theme - and various pop versions - have kept it in people's minds for 50 years. Listen and find out more

  • Set in Northern Ireland during the province's Troubles, Harry's Game was broadcast on ITV in 1982. Its haunting music was by the Irish group Clannad, featuring Enya's ethereal vocals. The song was commercially released, reaching the top five in both Ireland and the UK charts - the only UK hit single ever to be sung entirely in Irish Gaelic. It was also broadcast by U2 at the end of every concert during their 1983 War Tour and through the first round of the Joshua Tree Tour in 1987. Clannad went on to provide music for the drama series Robin of Sherwood. Listen and find out more

  • The Oscar-winning Shakespeare in Love composer Stephen Warbeck was originally signed to compose the music for HBO's ambitious fantasy TV series, but he was replaced at the last minute by Hans Zimmer protégé, Ramin Djawadi, best known for Iron Man and Clash of the Titles. His stirring score is dominated by the main title theme that Djawadi said he was inspired to write after viewing an early version of the series's computer-generated title sequence. The theme recurs in various guises throughout the episodes and has become Djawadi's most memorable and popular work, covered countless times in many different musical styles. Listen and find out more

  • Carl Davis made his name writing music for television dramas and in a wide variety of styles for the Thames Silents series - classic silent movies fully restored with complete, through-composed scores. Pastiche is Davis's great skill and his soundtrack to the popular 1995 TV version of Pride and Prejudice, starring Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle, is no exception. The urgent, quick tempo theme is a delightfully whimsical, neo-classical confection, fully evocative of Jane Austen's era. This is music that has also had a life outside of the television series that it accompanied, becoming a favourite in concerts and on radio. Listen and find out more

  • The popular detective drama series set in Hastings during and shortly after the Second World War was created by writer Anthony Horowitz, mastermind behind Midsomer Murders. It was commissioned by ITV after the long-running Inspector Morse came to an end in 2000. In the first six series, Detective Chief Superintendent Christopher Foyle attempts to catch criminals who are taking advantage of the confusion the war has created. Jim Parker - who also give Midsomer its distinctive musical flavour - created a Miss Marple-ish style theme for Foyle, with sparse orchestration providing a period feel, aided and abetted by outbursts of traditional jazz. Listen and find out more

  • There's a whole narrative that unfolds in Camille Saint-Saens's ghoulish Danse Macabre, for violin and piano, with the violin representing death himself and the story starting at midnight - hence the twelve chiming opening notes. So it was completely appropriate that the piece was chosen to open the Bafta-winning mystery crime series, from 1997 to 2013. It starred Alan Davies as the magician's assistant who solves apparently supernatural mysteries using his knowledge of trickery. The theme tune was arranged by Julian Stewart Lindsay who wrote the incidental music for the first three series, after which it was written by Rick Wentworth. Listen and find out more

  • It's hard to believe that there were only ever 12 episodes of Fawlty Towers; each one of them is packed so full of memorable scenes that it seems as if there were many more. It's all set at the eponymous Torquay hotel where rude, manic proprietor Basil (John Cleese) is henpecked by his wife Sybil (Prunella Scales), frustrated by the hapless Spanish waiter Manuel (Andrew Sachs), and frequently rescued by chambermaid Polly (Connie Booth). The music was inspired by a Beethoven Minuet with more than a touch of Boccherini, conjuring up the image of a ropey Palm Court string ensemble. Listen and find out more

  • Alfred Hitchcock Presents aired between 1955 and 1965 and featured the director introducing short dramas, thrillers, and mysteries. Its title sequence opened with the camera fading in on a simple caricature of Hitchcock's profile. For the music, his long-time collaborator, the composer Bernard Herrmann, suggested Charles Gounod's Funeral March of a Marionette. It plays while Hitchcock appears in silhouette at the right edge of the screen, and then walks centre to eclipse the caricature. He then almost always said "Good evening" in his flat, lugubrious voice. Both the caricature drawing and the theme music became indelibly associated with his image. Listen and find out more

  • The reality show follows a group of aspiring competitors, out to win £250,000 from Sir Alan Sugar, to be put towards a business of their own creation. The series has included a range of classical pieces, most famously its opening theme tune - the Dance of the Knights, also known as The Montagues and the Capulets, from Prokofiev's ballet, Romeo and Juliet, music that has probably not been matched for sheer drama since it was composed in the 1930s. It is also the music to which the players from Sunderland Athletic Football club run onto the pitch at home games. Listen and find out more

  • After composing for the stage and TV dramas, including The Jewel in the Crown, George Fenton has become the composer of choice for TV wildlife shows, often collaborating with the legendary David Attenborough. Fenton says that he loves composing for these shows. After just hearing the title for The Blue Planet, he turned down the offer of a film in America and flew straight back to begin work on the series. Other scores have included The Trials of Life, Planet Earth and Frozen Planet in 2011, which Planet focused on life and the environment in both the Arctic and Antarctic. Listen and find out more

  • This gentle theme tune to the popular series starring Dawn French is a setting of Psalm 23, 'The Lord Is My Shepherd'. For the show, Classic FM's former Composer-in-Residence Howard Goodall created a heart-warming, pastoral song which perfectly sets the scene for the comedy that follows it. The composer hoped that, in writing the theme, he would also be creating a piece of church music which would have a life of its own beyond the series. This has certainly been fulfilled in Psalm 23 which is regularly performed in churches and concerts and is loved by listeners to Classic FM. Listen and find out more

  • Mozart's Divertimento for two horns and string quartet is peppered with quirky moments, hence its more famous title, 'A Musical Joke'. Mozart never revealed the motivation behind this 1787 work, but it could be a bit of a dig at sub-standard players - the music is sprinkled with clumsy musical phrases, along with passages that mimic the effects of inaccurate notation and really poor performance. Why it came to be chosen as the theme music for TV coverage of the Horse of the Year show is a mystery but it worked remarkably well as the overture to some magnificent show jumping. Listen and find out more

  • Made in 1973-1974, The World at War was a 26-episode documentary series chronicling the events of the Second World War. In its day it was the most expensive series ever made, costing £900,000. It featured narration by Laurence Olivier and a majestic score by Carl Davis, notable for its dark, menacing opening theme. A landmark in British TV history, the series unusually focused on portraying the devastating experiences of the conflict not only on those who fought, but concentration camp inmates and the civilian victims. Continually shown on networks, there is a constant demand for the music from the series. Listen and find out more

  • British composer Christopher Gunning has composed seven symphonies, numerous concertos and other concert works, including a large number of scores for film and TV, winning 4 Bafta and 3 Ivor Novello Awards. Most famously, he created Poirot's iconic theme as well as the incidental music for series one, and episodes in series three to nine. Special music was written for each film, ranging from pastoral through to high tension. Poirot's own theme is a sultry saxophone solo that evokes both the stylish era of travel on the Orient Express and the slight air of malice always bubbling under the surface. Listen and find out more

  • Stu Phillips had produced a large number of TV and film scores when he was approached to compose music for the sci-fi series Battlestar Galactica in 1978. Considered a failure by studio bosses, the series didn't endure but the hours of soundtrack music composed by Phillips, successfully conjuring up the immensity of space, has remained popular with enthusiasts ever since. The main title was even turned into a dance hit, inspired by the chart success of a disco version of Star Wars. It's the most memorable music from the composer who also gave us Buck Rogers in the 21st Century. Listen and find out more